Crooked threads and cross-stitch

Crooked threads is a metaphor for those frustrated moments when we convey a message and mis-communication happens. Confusion arises and each player in the interaction is sure their version of events is the correct one.

My perception is that in these transactions, our blind spots emerge, and the shadow of our nature is revealed. Yet reflections can arise in the most remote places:

The image in this post, highlights the cross-stitch found in many Georgian gifts. This is one of many expressive traditions they promote. I discovered this delight in 2012, when I travelled with my husband and a group of Europeans to the highland region of Georgia, called Lakushdi, in the Sveneti region. I witnessed a culture which is inclusive, each individual is of intrinsic value; however they were conceived, or whatever their skill set. They are welcomed in circle, included in the Polyphonic songs, sacred chants and round dances that are a core part of festival days, and key life events, and confident to meet with strangers from foreign lands.

As a reader you may inquire as to how “Crooked threads and Cross-stitch” link up in my lateral thinking mind, let me explain: As an autist; I have felt the “strong sting of solitude”, and often wondered why difference in families, communities and institutions is met with such a negative press. As an activist for change in this area, how can I best serve those beloveds affected by such experiences?

What questions need to asked? So that fresh answers can be given? Coincidentally today a video landed in my email feed; It was a collaboration between Sue Hoya Sellars, Alice Walker and Shiloh Sophia. One particular conversation may partly commence this inquiry?

“How can we collectively come together and be of one mind, so as to create change? How can we take time just to listen to ourselves and each other? How can we all come to agreement? What keeps us from agreement? And from seeing patterns? What has to happen for us to draw on our cosmic power and enact our power? “ Sue Hoya Sellars


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